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luckydreaming:

my anaconda don’t…

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my anaconda don’t…

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My anaconda dont’ want none unless you got buns hun

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voldey:

mylesperhour:


[x]

oh no

oh yes

voldey:

mylesperhour:

[x]

oh no

oh yes

greatmoustachesploosh:

ffffuuuuccckkk 

riverlight82:

mord-talks:

This isn’t really all that surprising.

The sad thing is, I consider myself a feminist, but I hadn’t realized how easily I’d dismissed this woman without giving her a second thought.

fanbingblink:

((Also characters with intersectional identities as well))

Disclaimer: This is not an exhaustive list of all the types of representation in comics.

(**Wanda & Pietro Maximoff are also ethnically Jewish.)
sunflower-mama:

lesmemoirs:

blametherapistneverthevictim:

 

i’ve found my favourite 

WELL SHIT

sunflower-mama:

lesmemoirs:

blametherapistneverthevictim:

 

i’ve found my favourite 

WELL SHIT

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

stability:

philwrir:

officialfrenchtoast:

INTENSE

ITS BACK

I’m bringing this back from the depths of hell

timelordsandladies:

The Ladies of the Justice League

rlymax:

hey pull my finger

*finger detaches*

see you in court asshole

reservoirdoggedness:

Some snippets from all the truth being spoken in the #WhatIsBlackPrivilege hashtag on Twitter right now

I’ve said this before and I’ll point it out again -

Menstruation is caused by change in hormonal levels to stop the creation of a uterine lining and encourage the body to flush the lining out. The body does this by lowering estrogen levels and raising testosterone.

Or, to put it more plainly “That time of the month” is when female hormones most closely resemble male hormones. So if (cis) women aren’t suited to office at “That time of the month” then (cis) men are NEVER suited to office.

If you are a dude and don’t dig the ladies around you at their time of the month, just think! That is you all of the time.

And, on a final note, post-menopausal (cis) women are the most hormonally stable of all human demographics. They have fewer hormonal fluctuations of anyone, meaning older women like Hilary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren would theoretically be among the least likely candidates to make an irrational decision due to hormonal fluctuations, and if we were basing our leadership decisions on hormone levels, then only women over fifty should ever be allowed to hold office.

timemachineyeah (via ask-pauli-amorous)

Will always reblog this.

(via jessicalprice)